Bob on Baseball

Bob Wilber is the youngest of Del and Taffy Wilber's five children. After spending seven years in professional baseball, as a player, coach, and scout, he began a sports marketing and management career that now spans more than 25 years.

The Life-Altering College Years
Jul 12, 2014   //   by bwilber

College. To many, the word likely brings to mind stately 200-year old brick buildings covered in ivy, with amphitheater classrooms where white-haired professors lecture “on stage” in front of a wall of chalkboards. Or possibly it just brings to mind John Belushi and the cast of “Animal House”. My college years were plentifully hilarious, and full of the best friends a guy could make, but Southern Illinois University – Edwardsville was a long way from Harvard.

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One Remarkable Day
Mar 20, 2014   //   by bwilber

The date was September 29, 1979. The place was Royals Stadium in Kansas City. The Oakland A’s were in town for a three-game series against the Royals, one that would mark the end of another dreadful season, and on this night they would go down to their 108th loss on the year, taking it on the chin 6-2. Mike Morgan was the losing pitcher, dropping his record to 2-10.

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The Twins Connection Runs Deep
Jan 21, 2014   //   by bwilber

Sometimes it comes in a moment of clarity. The themes that run through your life become apparent, with the dots so clearly connected it’s a wonder it didn’t all seem so obvious for so many years. I spent a few days back in Minnesota this past week, and when I boarded the plane to return to our home in Spokane it all seemed so impossible to miss. This is a story of connection, to a place, to so many people, and to the Minnesota Twins.

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The Lost Art of Wearing a Uniform
Nov 1, 2013   //   by bwilber

The baseball postseason tends to bring a lot of “lost” or forgotten fans back to the fold, if only temporarily. One has to assume it’s the massive national attention, if not the prime-time games on major networks, that somehow snare those previously semi-interested followers and get them to pay attention again, if only for a night or a few innings. Frankly, that’s a good thing.

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1981 – A Year Beyond Comprehension
Aug 13, 2013   //   by bwilber

It’s likely that all of us have one particular year we can look back on as a complete stand-alone example of time compression, where so much happened it now seems inconceivable that it all occurred within the tight confines of January through December. It’s also likely that such a year came along at a very young age when, if you think about it, each year of life was a far greater percentage of the time we’d spent on the planet. Go to school for the first time, learn to read, have an amazing summer vacation, and then experience going back to school at a higher grade level than ever before, all at the age of five, and you’re talking about a monumental piece of a lifetime. My amazing and memorable year, though, took place in 1981, when I was 25 years old. Still a youngster compared to now, but old enough not to expect so much out of any 12-month period.

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Bob on Baseball

  • 07/12/2014 The Life-Altering College Years: College. To many, the word likely brings to mind stately 200-year old brick buildings covered in ivy, with amphitheater classrooms where white-haired ...
  • 06/21/2014 Q & A with Leo Kiely: Q & A with Leo Kiely Today's TPGF Interview is with Leo Kiely the newest member of The Perfect Game Foundation Advisory Council. Leo has had...
  • 06/03/2014 TPGF Fellow: Kira Jones: The following story was submitted by Kira Jones, a 2014 fellow of The Perfect Game Foundation. Name: Kira Jones School: University of Southern C...

In His Words

"There is no substitute for Excellence – not even success. Success is tricky, perishable and often outside our control; the pursuit of success makes a poor cornerstone, especially for a whole personality. Excellence is dependable, lasting and largely an issue within our own control; pursuit of excellence, in and for itself, is the best of foundations,” The Heart of the Order, by Thomas Boswell (Doubleday, 1989).